The Mona Lisa Kuleshov Effect (no sound)
Created on: January 26th, 2008
The Mona Lisa Kuleshov Effect (no sound)
This is a conscious attempt on my part to start a Kuleshov Effect craze. I thought about who to start with, and then I thought of The Mona Lisa. The woman with the most talked-about smile (what is she thinking?) in history. And I knew I had to use her.

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January 26th, 2008
(0)
what is the kuleshov effect? Good choices on paintings, some of my favorites of the italian rennaisance, but not sure what i'm looking for. ill check back here for a reply. 5 for the hell of it.
January 26th, 2008
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kuleshov_Effect
January 26th, 2008
(0)
montage effect demonstrated by Russian filmmaker Lev Kuleshov in about 1918. Kuleshov edited a short film in which shots of the face of Ivan Mozzhukhin (a Tsarist matinee idol) are alternated with various other shots (a plate of soup, a girl, an old woman's coffin). The film was shown to an audience who believed that the expression on Mozzhukhin's face was different each time he appeared, depending on whether he was "looking at" the plate of soup, the girl, or the coffin, showing an expression of hunger,
January 26th, 2008
(0)
, desire or grief respectively. Actually the footage of Mozzhukhin was identical, and rather expressionless, every time it appeared. Vsevolod Pudovkin (who later claimed to have been the co-creator of the experiment) described in 1929 how the audience "raved about the acting.... the heavy pensiveness of his mood over the forgotten soup, were touched and moved by the deep sorrow with which he looked on the dead woman, and admired the light, happy smile with which he surveyed the girl at play. But we knew tha
January 26th, 2008
(0)
But we knew that in all three cases the face was exactly the same." [Pudovkin, "Naturshchik vmesto aktera", in Sobranie sochinenii, volume I, Moscow: 1974, p.184]. Kuleshov used the experiment to indicate the usefulness and effectiveness of film editing. The implication is that viewers brought their own emotional reactions to this sequence of images, and then moreover attributed those reactions to the actor, investing his impassive face with their own feelings.
January 26th, 2008
(0)
The effect has also been studied by psychologists, and is well-known among modern film makers. Alfred Hitchc*ck refers to the effect in his conversations with François Truffaut, using actor Jimmy Stewart as the example.
January 26th, 2008
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The experiment itself was created by assembling fragments of pre-existing film from the Tsarist film industry, with no new material. Mozzhukhin had been the leading romantic "star" of Tsarist cinema, and familiar to the audience.
January 26th, 2008
(0)
Kuleshov demonstrated the necessity of considering montage as the basic tool of cinema art. In Kuleshov's view, the cinema consists of fragments and the assembly of those fragments, the assembly of elements which in reality are distinct. It is therefore not the content of the images in a film which is important, but their combination. The raw materials of such an art work need not be original, but are pre-fabricated elements which can be deconstructed and re-assembled by the artist into new juxtapositions.
January 26th, 2008
(0)
And credits. Leonardo - The Mona Lisa Michaelangelo - The David William Adolphe Bouguereau - The Birth of Venus Titian - Tarquin and Lucretia Artemisia Gentileschi - Judith Beheading Holofernes Dieric Bouts the Elder - The Fall of the Damned Christ Pantocrator from St. Catherine's Monastery in the Sinai Pieter Aertsen - The Adoration of the Magi Sandro Botticelli - Primavera
January 26th, 2008
(0)
all i see is penis and tits
January 26th, 2008
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January 26th, 2008
(0)
this confused and enraged me ummm Mona Lisa seemed the same in every pic...
January 26th, 2008
(1)
This doesn't really work. Since I already know that the Mona Lisa is a static image that cannot change its facial expressions to convey an emotion, the effect is lost.
January 26th, 2008
(0)
But of course the moment I say Kuleshov Effect, you know that any image I use for the reaction will always be the same. Or do you just think The Mona Lisa is too familiar?
January 29th, 2008
(0)
No, I didn't know what the Kuleshov Effect was when I saw this site. You can't use a static image for the repeating portion of the video, because otherwise the people watching it aren't looking at an actor, they're looking at a photo. There has to be some motion to convey the emotion. The fact that I knew beforehand that the Mona Lisa doesn't move ruined the effect even more.
February 5th, 2008
(0)
There does not have to be any motion! Where did you come up with that idea? It can just be a single expression with no movement at all. The idea of context is still there.